London – the Food Capital of the World

The UK has always had a bit of a negative stereotype when it comes to food. They only like big breakfasts, fish and chips, and the occasional roast dinner. So it’s time to dispel that notion because according to the Evening Standard, London is a haven for foodies. In fact, they even went as far to say it’s the “most diverse and exciting food capital of the world.”

Continue reading “London – the Food Capital of the World”

Living life Gluten free

I am not trying to be the self proclaiming gluten intolerant girl that wants the whole world to know she is a vegan or doesn’t eat gluten – because I am neither of those things. I am just a girl trying to figure out why my tummy is constantly bloated or rumbling (possibly last night’s pizza) and finding the best nutritions to tone this body up!

I love bread and carbs.

Yes I said it, judge! Continue reading “Living life Gluten free”

Singaporean Old School Delights

Everywhere you go in most developed countries, you see how children these days have no interest in playing outside and would rather immerse themselves in the virtual world. I grew up in Singapore in an old british army camp with beautiful bungalow houses and almost endless fields of green. We would have cobra snakes in our gardens (no lie) and bull frogs in our pond, competing on the loudest croak to impress the lady frogs. I would spend my free time outside with my neighbours in the longkangs (large drains) looking for guppy fish to catch or explore the “haunted” house a few streets behind us.

I can’t imagine a better childhood and I feel sorry for the children of this generation who will never have the same, real adventures because they are too busy on their iPads.

Anyway, I am drifting away from the main point of this post – Old School Delights. Continue reading “Singaporean Old School Delights”

Berry Beetroot Smoothie Recipe

The benefits of beetroots are endless and I have a love/hate relationship with them. I use to hate them growing up, but as you get older your palate starts to appreciate different tastes. Take red wine for example, I could never understand why anyone would choose to drink it. Now I crave it in the evenings (although I try not to give in).

Well with beetroot I have days when I just can’t wait to devour it, then somedays I hate it. But I have found a way to keep it jazzy with this mixed berry beetroot smoothie.

Continue reading “Berry Beetroot Smoothie Recipe”

Festive Couscous Salad recipe

First of all, Merry Christmas everyone. I trust it was full of love, alcohol and calories. Now, not that the feast has ended with the boxing day weekend, I thought I would help kick start the road back to healthy indulgence.

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Here is a simple, quick and easy couscous salad recipe that you can pair with your leftover turkey today. It does not only look like Christmas but tastes like it too thanks to the juicy and cheerful pomegranates. Continue reading “Festive Couscous Salad recipe”

Home-made Falafel

I know summer is over but we have now entered the time of year when summer bodies are made. I am going to start writing more about my fitness journey/struggles, great meal recipes and tips for achieving your goal in time for summer 2016 while I try to achieve mine. Whether your just trying to be healthier and watch your food intake, trying to cut down processed foods or just attempting to look like Beyonce, the outcome all depends on what you eat. Continue reading “Home-made Falafel”

Breakfast for the soul – Top 5 ways to start your day in Southeast Asia

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and while I love a full english, it just does not compare to the more greasy, flavoursome breakfast options in Southeast Asia. You think Curry and rice are just for lunch or dinner? Think again. These are a few of my all time favourite dishes to start the day with, and many variations of these dishes can be found across Asia.

Rava ThosaiRava ThosaiRava Dosa

This wholesome meal originates from South India but is also very popular in Sri lanka, Malaysia and Singapore. Rava means semolina, which is one of the main ingredients to this vegetarian dish. Think of this as a version of savoury crepe, just with so much more flavour, as all things in Asia. The dosa is usually accompanied by a mildly spicy vegetable curry and coconut chutney.

Chee Cheong FunChee Cheong fun

This is one of the meals I tend to crave every once in awhile. It is a rice noodle roll, fun meaning rice. It originates from southern China and can also be found in Hongkong, Singapore and Malaysia. “Chee cheong” means pig intestine, however, fear not! The meal contains no intestine of any sort, it just happens to look like one.

Other variations include a piece of pork or shrimp rolled up in the rice noodle. However, Chee cheong fun has no fillings. The timzheong sauce brings the main flavour to this dish, just thinking about it makes me hungry. There is a savoury and sweet version, the one you see below is sweet, covered in the sweet black sauce (similar to hoisin sauce), accompanied by a cold glass of fresh sugar cane juice – bliss.

ApamAppam

This is one of my all time favourites and a known must have at my Grandma´s when I visit. This is a popular Sri Lankan cuisine which can also be found across Singapore (especially in little India or Changi Airport). Appam, also known as hoppers is a, is a crispy pancake with a soft and fluffy centre made of fermented rice.

Whilst, the  “hopper” can be eaten either savoury or sweet, the version I grew up on was sweet, topped of with a lot of coconut milk and sugar while being fried on the specialized pan. The rice centre soaked up the coconut milk, leaving it moist and creamy. What you usually find in shops or street stalls is the plain Appam as seen below served with a bowl of coconut milk and gula melaka ( coconut palm sugar) separately. The difference to these two variations is in the texture of the soft centre.

I can easily have 4 of these for breakfast, however, my heart tends not to agree with this calorific sin. But it is definitely something you have to try!

Tao hueySoya Bean Curd Pudding

This mildly sweet pudding is made of soya bean and is eaten either for breakfast or as a snack. It’s creamy taste and silky texture is the reason this warm pudding is so popular in Singapore and Malaysia, where it is served with a clear syrup and also known as Tau Huay. Other variations of this can be found across Southeast Asia and China with toppings such as peanut and ginger.

Tao Suan Tao Suan

Although Tao Suan is typically a dessert, I justify it as a breakfast dish. This is a green bean starchy sweet soup served with Youtiao (similar to a light fried dumpling). According to the Chinese, this soup helps with indigestion and cools the body. According to me, it soothes the soul. You can find this in most food courts in Singapore by the dessert section.

Now do you still want that english breakfast?